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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

TABLE 2
World Population by Major Areas, 1960 to 2000, According to the High Variant Projection of the United Nations
(millions)					
Area	1960	1970	1980	1990	2000
World total	2,998	3,659	4,551	5,690	6,994
More developed areas	976	1,102	1,245	1,402	1,574
Europe	425	458	492	526	563
Soviet Union	214	254	296	346	403
Northern America	199	233	275	323	376
Oceania	16	19	23	29	35
Less developed areas	2,022	2,557	3,306	4,288	5,420
East Asia	794	956	1,171	1,405	1,623
South Asia	865	1,108	1,448	1,910	2,443
Africa	273	348	463	629	864
Latin America	212	283	383	522	686
Northern Areas	1,632	1,901	2,234	2,600	2,966
Southern Areas	1,366	1,758	2,317	3,090	4,028
Source: (10, p. 135).
developed areas Oceania, with its small numbers, would continue to grow most rapidly, reaching 34.8 million in 2000 from 15.7 million in 1960, more than doubling. Northern America and the Soviet Union would increase at about the same rate, close to 90 percent, between 1960 and 2000. Northern America would reach a total of 376 million, the Soviet Union 403 million. Europe would continue to grow more slowly, rising from 425 to 563 million, an increase of 30 percent.
Among the less developed regions, Latin America and Africa would increase the fastest, each of them more than tripling between 1960 and the end of the century. Africa would reach a total of 864 million by 2000; Latin America, 686 million. South Asia would more than double, increasing from 865 million to 2.4 billion. East Asia, including mainland China, would also more than double, increasing from 794 million in 1960 to 1.6 billion by 2000.
The remarkable upsurge in population growth1* in the developing regions is dramatized by the contrast in the midcentury populations of northern and Latin America with their projected century-end populations. In 1950, northern America with 166 million persons had a population 4 million greater than Latin America. By 2000, it is possible that Latin America with 686 million inhabitants will exceed the population of northern America by over 300ns by the end of the century, or by 170 percent. In contrast, the developed areas would increase by only 598 million persons, or by about 60 percent. The population increase in the developing areas would be over five times as great as that in the more developed areas. Moreover, the developing areas would increase in the last 4 decades of this century by a number of persons about as great as the population of the globe in 1968.